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Marcy's Journal

 

6/16/11

End of School Year Mayhem

Tutoring

Team in Town

 

End of School Year Mayhem (see pictures)

This end of year has been busy with all four kids in school.  The ‘big’ graduations in Honduras are Kindergarten and 6th grade (which would make sense after that big test all in Spanish about Honduran history).  However, looking at the culture, with children not going to school beyond 6th grade or not making it to 6th grade, I can kind of understand why it is a big deal. 

     Mikayla’s class (6th grade) had full caps and gowns, whereas Jeremiah’s class (K) could barely keep those caps on (gowns would have been a nightmare!).

     Other activities included parties and a baby shower for Bek’s teacher and last time hang-outs with friendsmoving to other countries.  Katarina has a friend moving back to Germany.  Rebekah has a friend moving back to Taiwan.  Mikayla has a classmate moving back to the States.

     Pray for Discovery school:  enrollment (each class would be full), excellent staff and teachers, new ideas and ways to raise funds or apply for grants, etc.  Pray for the students that are parting ways (peace, ease in transition) and for new students coming (peace, ease in transition, language acclamation, receptivity of classmates).  Thank goodness, Discovery School (http://www.discoveryschool.edu.hn/) is known for its small class size, and since the students are used to students being there for only 1-3 years, they are very good about including and being friends with everyone. 

Tutoring

Before the school year was even done, Kjell was being asked to tutor throughout the summer.  One student comes Monday through Friday for two hours each morning (for English, more for learning to speak English rather than reading or writing).  The other student was a former student who needs help with writing (English at a college level).  He comes Tuesday and Thursday for two hours in the afternoon. 

             

Team in Town (see pictures)

The Baptist church in Santa Lucia (“Maranatha Independent Baptist Church”) has a team here from the States.  We were invited to and went to the Wednesday night service.  One of the team members played a solo on violin.  I am tempted to bring my violin back to Honduras next time I visit the States.   Originally, I did not want it to get ruined from humidity (and our other house had mold on the walls), but in this house the basement is cool and I think it would survive.  Let’s see how rainy season goes and that will solidify whether I can bring it.

     The cool thing about this team, is that the Pastor and his wife just started a Spanish service in Virginia (in the States)!  There is a 30% Spanish population where they live.   The wife (whose name is Bonita – which means pretty in Spanish!) was a missionary kid herself, but in Africa.  So, I asked her if she liked about being a missionary kid and what she liked or disliked that her parents did or didn’t do.  She loved it.  Her parents always reminded her (and siblings) of how blessed they were (by pointing out experiences that other kids would never have) and praised God for what they did have when things were not so great.  Her family had to leave everything behind when they were evacuated from Africa during a civil war (so she grew up in the States for a bit, too). 

     We were also invited to hand out tracts on Thursday.  This was great because I got two maps of different parts of Santa Lucia that the Pastor had drawn from memory.  I got to meet a bunch of people in town and found out many things about the town:

  • The people are afraid of white people.  One member from the team was talking with the worker at the hotel and she said she was afraid because white people come up and ask all sorts of questions.  We had very few people come out of their homes and the ones that did were hesitant.  This is unusual for me because in Zambrano, they love white people – inviting them in their homes – receiving prayer and offering coffee. 
  • There is a central pila station.  The pila is the cement basin that fills up with water (used to bathe, wash clothes, etc.) and it has a built in washboard.  This special area is for those who do not have water.  They can come and wash their clothes.  I’ve never seen this in any other community in Honduras. 
  • There is a school for the blind.
  • Soccer fields do exist and now we know how to get to them (follow our new map).

 

End of School Year  

The graduates

Isa, Mikayla, Adriana

Honduran anthem

Diploma

Jeremiah and Miss Sophia

Look at me!

I'm so tired...

I thought our song had 'moves' in it

Oh yeah... sing it!

What I like about Kindergarten is the WHOLE school!

Now recorder... I can do this...

My diploma

Team in Town  

We walked right through there, inbetween homes

Paths to more homes

Mikayla, Jeremiah, and team

Jeremiah wants a rest when he sees the church

It did not take Jeremiah long to realize he wanted to hand something out.

View from the top of a road, looking over at the school

 

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2010

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2008

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